Prevalence of hypertension in Mexico City and San Antonio, Texas

Steven Haffner, Clicerio González Villalpando, Helen P Hazuda, Rodolfo Valdez, Leena Mykkänen, Michael Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Few data are available on the prevalence of hypertension in Mexico. Methods and Results: We compared the prevalence of mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg and/or use of antihypertensive medications) in 1500 low-income Mexican Americans who participated in the San Antonio Heart Study and 2280 low- income Mexicans who participated in the Mexico City Diabetes Study. The crude prevalence of mild hypertension was 17.1% in Mexican men versus 24.4% in Mexican American men (P=.001) and 17.4% in Mexican women versus 22.0% in Mexican American women (P=.005). After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), educational attainment, and percent native American genetic admixture (Caucasian and native American), the odds ratio (Mexico City/San Antonio) was 0.55 (95% CI, 0.39, 0.77; P<.001) in men and 0.81 (CI, 0.54, 1.12; P=.201) in women. In a pooled model including both men and women, the odds ratio was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.53, 0.84; P<.001). In the pooled model, city, age, female sex, NIDDM, BMI, WHR, and low educational attainment were significantly related to the prevalence of hypertension. Conclusions: The causes for these differences in hypertension prevalence are not known but may reflect a less modernized lifestyle in Mexico City, including greater physical activity, less obesity, and the consumption of a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1542-1549
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation
Volume90
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1994

Fingerprint

Mexico
Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Waist-Hip Ratio
North American Indians
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Odds Ratio
Fat-Restricted Diet
Antihypertensive Agents
Life Style
Obesity
Carbohydrates
Exercise

Keywords

  • diabetes mellitus
  • hypertension
  • Mexican Americans
  • Mexico
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Haffner, S., Villalpando, C. G., Hazuda, H. P., Valdez, R., Mykkänen, L., & Stern, M. (1994). Prevalence of hypertension in Mexico City and San Antonio, Texas. Circulation, 90(3), 1542-1549.

Prevalence of hypertension in Mexico City and San Antonio, Texas. / Haffner, Steven; Villalpando, Clicerio González; Hazuda, Helen P; Valdez, Rodolfo; Mykkänen, Leena; Stern, Michael.

In: Circulation, Vol. 90, No. 3, 09.1994, p. 1542-1549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haffner, S, Villalpando, CG, Hazuda, HP, Valdez, R, Mykkänen, L & Stern, M 1994, 'Prevalence of hypertension in Mexico City and San Antonio, Texas', Circulation, vol. 90, no. 3, pp. 1542-1549.
Haffner S, Villalpando CG, Hazuda HP, Valdez R, Mykkänen L, Stern M. Prevalence of hypertension in Mexico City and San Antonio, Texas. Circulation. 1994 Sep;90(3):1542-1549.
Haffner, Steven ; Villalpando, Clicerio González ; Hazuda, Helen P ; Valdez, Rodolfo ; Mykkänen, Leena ; Stern, Michael. / Prevalence of hypertension in Mexico City and San Antonio, Texas. In: Circulation. 1994 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 1542-1549.
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AU - Villalpando, Clicerio González

AU - Hazuda, Helen P

AU - Valdez, Rodolfo

AU - Mykkänen, Leena

AU - Stern, Michael

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N2 - Background: Few data are available on the prevalence of hypertension in Mexico. Methods and Results: We compared the prevalence of mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg and/or use of antihypertensive medications) in 1500 low-income Mexican Americans who participated in the San Antonio Heart Study and 2280 low- income Mexicans who participated in the Mexico City Diabetes Study. The crude prevalence of mild hypertension was 17.1% in Mexican men versus 24.4% in Mexican American men (P=.001) and 17.4% in Mexican women versus 22.0% in Mexican American women (P=.005). After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), educational attainment, and percent native American genetic admixture (Caucasian and native American), the odds ratio (Mexico City/San Antonio) was 0.55 (95% CI, 0.39, 0.77; P<.001) in men and 0.81 (CI, 0.54, 1.12; P=.201) in women. In a pooled model including both men and women, the odds ratio was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.53, 0.84; P<.001). In the pooled model, city, age, female sex, NIDDM, BMI, WHR, and low educational attainment were significantly related to the prevalence of hypertension. Conclusions: The causes for these differences in hypertension prevalence are not known but may reflect a less modernized lifestyle in Mexico City, including greater physical activity, less obesity, and the consumption of a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet.

AB - Background: Few data are available on the prevalence of hypertension in Mexico. Methods and Results: We compared the prevalence of mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg and/or use of antihypertensive medications) in 1500 low-income Mexican Americans who participated in the San Antonio Heart Study and 2280 low- income Mexicans who participated in the Mexico City Diabetes Study. The crude prevalence of mild hypertension was 17.1% in Mexican men versus 24.4% in Mexican American men (P=.001) and 17.4% in Mexican women versus 22.0% in Mexican American women (P=.005). After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), educational attainment, and percent native American genetic admixture (Caucasian and native American), the odds ratio (Mexico City/San Antonio) was 0.55 (95% CI, 0.39, 0.77; P<.001) in men and 0.81 (CI, 0.54, 1.12; P=.201) in women. In a pooled model including both men and women, the odds ratio was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.53, 0.84; P<.001). In the pooled model, city, age, female sex, NIDDM, BMI, WHR, and low educational attainment were significantly related to the prevalence of hypertension. Conclusions: The causes for these differences in hypertension prevalence are not known but may reflect a less modernized lifestyle in Mexico City, including greater physical activity, less obesity, and the consumption of a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet.

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