Prevalence, injury-, and non-injury-related factors associated with anxiety and depression in polytrauma patients – A retrospective 20 year follow-up study

Sascha Halvachizadeh, Henrik Teuber, Till Berk, Florin Allemann, Roland von Känel, Boris Zelle, Paolo Cinelli, Hans Christoph Pape, Roman Pfeifer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction Survival rate after polytrauma increased over the past decades resulting in an increase of long-term complaints. These include physical and psychological impairments. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and risk factors for developing depression and anxiety more than twenty years after polytrauma. Methods We contacted patients who were treated due to a polytrauma between 1973 and 1990 at one level 1 trauma center after more than 20 years. These patients received a self-administered questionnaire, to assess symptoms of depression and anxiety. Analysis based on multivariable logistic regression models include injury severity and non-injury related factors to determine risk factors associated with the development of depression and anxiety. Results Patients included in this study (n = 337) had a mean ISS of 20.3 (4 to 50) points. In total, 173 (51.3%) showed psychiatric sequelae (depression n = 163, 48.2%; anxiety n = 14, 4.1%). Injury severity was not associated with the development of depression or anxiety. However, the patients, who required psychiatric therapy prior to the injury had higher risk of developing psychiatric symptoms (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.8, p = 0.018) as did patients who suffered from additional psychiatric insults after the injury (OR 1.4, 95%CI 1.2 to 2.0, p = 0.049). Conclusion More than half of polytrauma patients developed psychiatric sequelae. Risk factors include mainly non-injury related factors such as psychiatric comorbidities and additional psychiatric insults after the injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0232678
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence, injury-, and non-injury-related factors associated with anxiety and depression in polytrauma patients – A retrospective 20 year follow-up study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this