Prepubertal castration eliminates sex differences in lifespan and growth trajectories in genetically heterogeneous mice

Nisi Jiang, Catherine J. Cheng, Jonathan Gelfond, Randy Strong, Vivian Diaz, James F. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sex differences in aging and longevity have been widely observed, with females consistently outliving males across human populations. However, the mechanisms driving these disparities remain poorly understood. In this study, we explored the influence of post-pubertal testicular effects on sex differences in aging by prepubertally castrating genetically heterogeneous (UM-HET3) mice, a unique mouse model that emulates human sex differences in age-related mortality. Prepubertal castration eliminated the longevity disparity between sexes by reducing the elevated early- to mid-life mortality rate observed in males and extending their median lifespan to match that of females. Additionally, castration extended the duration of body weight growth and attenuated the inverse correlation between early-age body weight and lifespan in males, aligning their growth trajectories with those of females. Our findings suggest that post-pubertal testicular actions in genetically diverse mice are primarily responsible for sex differences in longevity as well as growth trajectories. These findings offer a foundation for further investigation into the fundamental mechanisms driving sex-specific aging patterns and the development of potential pro-longevity interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13891
JournalAging cell
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2023

Keywords

  • age-specific mortality
  • aging
  • body composition
  • body weight
  • castration
  • growth
  • lifespan
  • sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cell Biology

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