Preoperative Pain Management Education: An Evidence-Based Practice Project

Katherine F O'donnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a preoperative pain management patient education intervention on improving patients’ pain management outcomes. Design: The project was conducted in an outpatient general surgery service at a teaching institution for patients undergoing same-day surgery. Intervention patients received one-on-one education on postoperative pain management including how to take medications, managing medication side effects, using nonpharmacologic methods, and reporting inadequate postoperative pain control. Comparison patients received general education from multiple health care providers, and this information may not have been consistent. Methods: Intervention patients received education at the first preoperative clinic visit. Patients in the intervention and comparison groups completed the Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire during their first postoperative clinic visit. Results were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test/Wilcoxon rank sum test. Findings: A 12-month project (N = 99) showed statistically significant results (P =.020 and P =.001, respectively) in questions about side effects and whether the patient was encouraged to use nonpharmacologic methods to reduce pain. The intervention group reported the effects of pain on mood (P =.067) and use of nonpharmacologic methods (P =.052); however, these results were not statistically significant. Conclusions: More intervention patients than comparison patients reported medication side effects and were encouraged to use nonpharmacologic methods for reducing postoperative pain. Intervention patients also reported the effects of pain on mood and the use of nonpharmacologic methods more frequently than comparison patients. Preoperative pain management education may increase patients’ knowledge in key areas of postoperative pain management to prevent negative outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)956-963
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Perianesthesia Nursing
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Evidence-Based Practice
Pain Management
Education
Postoperative Pain
Nonparametric Statistics
Patient Education
Ambulatory Care
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Pain
compound A 12
Health Personnel
Teaching

Keywords

  • evidence-based practice
  • pain management outcomes
  • postoperative pain
  • preoperative pain management education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medical–Surgical

Cite this

Preoperative Pain Management Education : An Evidence-Based Practice Project. / O'donnell, Katherine F.

In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.12.2018, p. 956-963.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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