Predictors of recent mental health service use in a medical population: Implications for integrated care

Tracey Ledoux, Michael D. Barnett, Luz M. Garcini, Jeff Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between physical and mental health and psychosocial variables and recent (within the last 12 months) mental health service use among 240 medical patients recruited from general and specialty outpatient clinics at an academic medical center. Results indicated 43.3% of the participants had recently received mental health services in the form of psychotropic medication (75%), psychotherapy (2%), or a combination of these treatments (20.2%). Among patients with moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety or depression, approximately two-thirds were receiving mental health treatment. Moreover, four variables (healthcare provider referral for mental health services, perceived need for mental health services, prior use of mental health services, and frequency of medical appointments) were significant unique predictors of recent mental health service use. This suggests collaborative/integrated medical care may increase needed mental health service use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-310
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Medical patients
  • Mental health help-seeking
  • Mental healthcare use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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