Predictors of pressure ulcer incidence following traumatic spinal cord injury: A secondary analysis of a prospective longitudinal study

D. Brienza, S. Krishnan, P. Karg, G. Sowa, A. L. Allegretti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study design: Secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the medical and demographic factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers during acute-care hospitalization and inpatient rehabilitation following acute spinal cord injury. Setting: The study was carried out at acute hospitalization, inpatient rehabilitation and outpatient rehabilitation sites at a university medical center in the United States. Methods: Adults with acute traumatic spinal cord injury (n=104) were recruited within 24-72 h of admission to the hospital. Pressure ulcer incidence was recorded. Results: Thirty-nine participants out of 104 (37.5%) developed at least one pressure ulcer during acute-care hospitalization and inpatient rehabilitation. Univariate logistic regression analyses revealed significant association of pressure ulcer incidence for those with pneumonia and mechanical ventilation (P=0.01) and higher injury severity (Asia A) (P=0.01). Multiple logistic regression showed that the odds of formation of a first pressure ulcer in participants with Asia A was 4.5 times greater than that for participants with Asia B, CI (1-20.65), P=0.05, and 4.6 times greater than that for participants with Asia C, CI (1.3-16.63), P=0.01. Conclusion: Among individuals with acute traumatic SCI, those with high-injury severity were at an increased risk to develop pressure ulcers. Pneumonia was noted to be associated with the formation of pressure ulcers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-34
Number of pages7
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Predictors of pressure ulcer incidence following traumatic spinal cord injury: A secondary analysis of a prospective longitudinal study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this