Practitioner participation in national dental practice-based research network (PBRN) studies: 12-year results

Rahma Mungia, Ellen Funkhouser, Meredith K. Buchberg Trejo, Rachel Cohen, Stephanie C. Reyes, David L. Cochran, Sonia K. Makhija, Cyril Meyerowitz, Brad D. Rindal, Valeria V. Gordan, Jeffrey L. Fellows, Jason D. McCargar, Pamela A. McMahon, Gregg H. Gilbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study examines practitioner participation over 12 years in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network (PBRN) studies and practitioner meetings, average length of participation, and association of practitioner-and practice-level characteristics with participation. Little information exists about practitioners' long-term participation in PBRNs. Methods: The network conducted a retrospective analysis of practitioner participation in 3 main network activities during 2005 to 2017. Practitioners who completed an enrollment questionnaire, practiced in the United States, and either attended a network meeting or received an invitation to complete a questionnaire or clinical study were included in the analysis. Practitioners (n 3669) met inclusion criteria. The network implemented 38 studies (28 clinical and 10 questionnaire), 23 of which (15 clinical and 8 questionnaire) met the criteria for the current analysis. Results: Overall, 86% (N 3148) participated in at least 1 network activity during 2005 to 2017. Questionnaire studies had the highest rate with 81% (N 2963) completing at least 1, 21% (N 762) completed at least 1 clinical study and 19% (N 700) attended at least 1 network meeting. Among 1578 practitioners enrolled in the first 5 years of the Network launch, 20% (N 320) participated in multiple network activities over 5 to 9 years, and 14% (N 238) for 10 to 12 years. Practitioner characteristics associated with participation varied depending on the activity assessed. Conclusion: The network engaged practitioners in its research activities with relatively high participation rates over a 12-year period. Strategies employed by the network to engage practitioners may serve as a model for PBRN networks for other allied health professions. (J Am Board Fam Med 2018;31:844-856.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)844-856
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2018

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Allied health personnel
  • Health occupations
  • Retrospective studies
  • Surveys and questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this