Pounds off with empowerment (POWER): A clinical trial of weight management strategies for black and white adults with diabetes who live in medically underserved rural communities

Elizabeth J. Mayer-Davis, Angela M. D'Antonio, Sharon M. Smith, Gregory Kirkner, Sarah Levin Martin, Deborah M Parra-medina, Richard Schultz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We evaluated lifestyle interventions for diabetic persons who live in rural communities. Methods. We conducted a 12-month randomized clinical trial (n = 152) of "intensive-lifestyle" (modeled after the NIH Diabetes Prevention Program) and "reimbursable-lifestyle" (intensive-lifestyle intervention delivered in the time allotted for Medicare reimbursement for diabetes education related to nutrition and physical activity) interventions with usual care as a control. Results. Modest weight loss occurred by 6 months among intensive-lifestyle participants and was greater than the weight loss among usual-care participants (2.6kg vs 0.4 kg, P<.01). At 12 months, a greater proportion of intensive-lifestyle participants had lost 2 kg or more than usual-care participants (49% vs 25%, P<.05). No differences in weight change were observed between reimbursable-lifestyle and usual-care participants. Glycated hemoglobin was reduced among all groups (P<.05) but was not different between groups. Conclusions. Improvement in both weight and glycemia was attainable by lifestyle interventions designed for persons who had type 2 diabetes and lived in rural communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1736-1742
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume94
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Rural Population
Life Style
Clinical Trials
Weights and Measures
Weight Loss
Power (Psychology)
hydroquinone
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Medicare
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Randomized Controlled Trials
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mayer-Davis, E. J., D'Antonio, A. M., Smith, S. M., Kirkner, G., Martin, S. L., Parra-medina, D. M., & Schultz, R. (2004). Pounds off with empowerment (POWER): A clinical trial of weight management strategies for black and white adults with diabetes who live in medically underserved rural communities. American Journal of Public Health, 94(10), 1736-1742.

Pounds off with empowerment (POWER) : A clinical trial of weight management strategies for black and white adults with diabetes who live in medically underserved rural communities. / Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; D'Antonio, Angela M.; Smith, Sharon M.; Kirkner, Gregory; Martin, Sarah Levin; Parra-medina, Deborah M; Schultz, Richard.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 94, No. 10, 10.2004, p. 1736-1742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J. ; D'Antonio, Angela M. ; Smith, Sharon M. ; Kirkner, Gregory ; Martin, Sarah Levin ; Parra-medina, Deborah M ; Schultz, Richard. / Pounds off with empowerment (POWER) : A clinical trial of weight management strategies for black and white adults with diabetes who live in medically underserved rural communities. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2004 ; Vol. 94, No. 10. pp. 1736-1742.
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