Porphyrin Metabolism in the Harderian Glands of Syrian Hamsters: In Vivo Regulation by Testicular Hormones, Lighting Conditions, Pineal Gland, and Pituitary Hormones

Carmen Rodriguez, Armando Menendez-Pelaez, Russel J. Reiter, Gerald R. Buzzell, Mary K. Vaughan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The porphyrin concentration in the harderian glands of male hamsters subjected to several endocrine manipulations was studied. Prolonged bilateral gonadectomy resulted in a marked increase in harderian porphyrin concentration. This change was not prevented by either pinealectomy or by constant white light exposure. Castrated hamsters exposed to constant red light showed higher porphyrin concentrations than castrated hamsters kept under white light. Among several hormones studied, serum luteinizing hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were unexpectedly higher in the constant red light exposed group than in the other groups. In order to test whether luteinizing hormone was involved in the postcastrational rise in harderian porphyrins, we administered a potent luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. The chronic administration of the LHRH agonist resulted in a decrease in serum luteinizing hormone (because it desensitized the LHRH receptors on the gonadotropes) and, consequently, in serum testosterone levels. However, no rise in harderian porphyrin was observed. It is concluded that the absence of testicular hormones might not be the triggering factor involved in harderian porphyrogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-29
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Volume200
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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