Platinum analogs in recurrent and advanced head and neck cancer: a Southwest Oncology Group and Wayne State University Study.

M. Al-Sarraf, B. Metch, J. Kish, J. Ensley, J. J. Rinehart, D. E. Schuller, C. A. Coltman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cisplatin combinations are active in patients with epidermoid cancer of the head and neck. Because of the incidence of dose-limiting toxicity and the need for hospitalization for iv hydration and mannitol diuresis, the search for active analog(s) with less of such toxicity has been intensive. In a limited institution study of Wayne State University and the Southwest Oncology Group, a clinical trial of carboplatin (CBDCA) and iproplatin (CHIP) in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer was carried out. Sixty-four patients were entered and 63 were evaluated, 29 receiving CBDCA and 34 receiving CHIP therapy. These patients were stratified according to important prognostic factors. The response rate to CBDCA was 24% (seven responses among 29 patients; three complete responses and four partial responses), and to CHIP was 12% (four responses among 34 patients; one complete response and three partial responses). Both drugs were administered without prior hydration or mannitol diuresis on an outpatient basis. The major side effect was myelosuppression, which was reversible but cumulative and dose-limiting. Less severe vomiting occurred as compared to the incidence of this toxicity with cisplatin and no significant renal or hearing loss occurred. It was concluded that further evaluation of these agents with other active drug(s) in patients with head and neck cancer is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)723-726
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Treatment Reports
Volume71
Issue number7-8
StatePublished - Jul 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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