Plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk in the select trial

Theodore M. Brasky, Amy K. Darke, Xiaoling Song, Catherine M. Tangen, Phyllis J. Goodman, Ian M. Thompson, Frank L. Meyskens, Gary E. Goodman, Lori M. Minasian, Howard L. Parnes, Eric A. Klein, Alan R. Kristal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

175 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BackgroundStudies of dietary ω-3 fatty acid intake and prostate cancer risk are inconsistent; however, recent large prospective studies have found increased risk of prostate cancer among men with high blood concentrations of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ([LCω-3PUFA] 20:5ω3; 22:5ω3; 22:6ω3]. This case-cohort study examines associations between plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk among participants in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial.MethodsCase subjects were 834 men diagnosed with prostate cancer, of which 156 had high-grade cancer. The subcohort consisted of 1393 men selected randomly at baseline and from within strata frequency matched to case subjects on age and race. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between fatty acids and prostate cancer risk overall and by grade. All statistical tests were two-sided.ResultsCompared with men in the lowest quartiles of LCω-3PUFA, men in the highest quartile had increased risks for low-grade (HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.93), high-grade (HR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.00 to 2.94), and total prostate cancer (HR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.88). Associations were similar for individual long-chain ω-3 fatty acids. Higher linoleic acid (ω-6) was associated with reduced risks of low-grade (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.56 to 0.99) and total prostate cancer (HR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.59 to 1.01); however, there was no dose response.ConclusionsThis study confirms previous reports of increased prostate cancer risk among men with high blood concentrations of LCω-3PUFA. The consistency of these findings suggests that these fatty acids are involved in prostate tumorigenesis. Recommendations to increase LCω-3PUFA intake should consider its potential risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1132-1141
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume105
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 2013

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Phospholipids
Prostatic Neoplasms
Fatty Acids
Confidence Intervals
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Linoleic Acid
Selenium
Vitamin E
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostate
Neoplasms
Carcinogenesis
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Brasky, T. M., Darke, A. K., Song, X., Tangen, C. M., Goodman, P. J., Thompson, I. M., ... Kristal, A. R. (2013). Plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk in the select trial. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 105(15), 1132-1141. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djt174

Plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk in the select trial. / Brasky, Theodore M.; Darke, Amy K.; Song, Xiaoling; Tangen, Catherine M.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Thompson, Ian M.; Meyskens, Frank L.; Goodman, Gary E.; Minasian, Lori M.; Parnes, Howard L.; Klein, Eric A.; Kristal, Alan R.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 105, No. 15, 07.08.2013, p. 1132-1141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brasky, TM, Darke, AK, Song, X, Tangen, CM, Goodman, PJ, Thompson, IM, Meyskens, FL, Goodman, GE, Minasian, LM, Parnes, HL, Klein, EA & Kristal, AR 2013, 'Plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk in the select trial', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 105, no. 15, pp. 1132-1141. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djt174
Brasky TM, Darke AK, Song X, Tangen CM, Goodman PJ, Thompson IM et al. Plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk in the select trial. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2013 Aug 7;105(15):1132-1141. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djt174
Brasky, Theodore M. ; Darke, Amy K. ; Song, Xiaoling ; Tangen, Catherine M. ; Goodman, Phyllis J. ; Thompson, Ian M. ; Meyskens, Frank L. ; Goodman, Gary E. ; Minasian, Lori M. ; Parnes, Howard L. ; Klein, Eric A. ; Kristal, Alan R. / Plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk in the select trial. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2013 ; Vol. 105, No. 15. pp. 1132-1141.
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abstract = "BackgroundStudies of dietary ω-3 fatty acid intake and prostate cancer risk are inconsistent; however, recent large prospective studies have found increased risk of prostate cancer among men with high blood concentrations of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ([LCω-3PUFA] 20:5ω3; 22:5ω3; 22:6ω3]. This case-cohort study examines associations between plasma phospholipid fatty acids and prostate cancer risk among participants in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial.MethodsCase subjects were 834 men diagnosed with prostate cancer, of which 156 had high-grade cancer. The subcohort consisted of 1393 men selected randomly at baseline and from within strata frequency matched to case subjects on age and race. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) for associations between fatty acids and prostate cancer risk overall and by grade. All statistical tests were two-sided.ResultsCompared with men in the lowest quartiles of LCω-3PUFA, men in the highest quartile had increased risks for low-grade (HR = 1.44, 95{\%} CI = 1.08 to 1.93), high-grade (HR = 1.71, 95{\%} CI = 1.00 to 2.94), and total prostate cancer (HR = 1.43, 95{\%} CI = 1.09 to 1.88). Associations were similar for individual long-chain ω-3 fatty acids. Higher linoleic acid (ω-6) was associated with reduced risks of low-grade (HR = 0.75, 95{\%} CI = 0.56 to 0.99) and total prostate cancer (HR = 0.77, 95{\%} CI = 0.59 to 1.01); however, there was no dose response.ConclusionsThis study confirms previous reports of increased prostate cancer risk among men with high blood concentrations of LCω-3PUFA. The consistency of these findings suggests that these fatty acids are involved in prostate tumorigenesis. Recommendations to increase LCω-3PUFA intake should consider its potential risks.",
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AU - Goodman, Phyllis J.

AU - Thompson, Ian M.

AU - Meyskens, Frank L.

AU - Goodman, Gary E.

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