PHYSIOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS: CONTROL OF HEAT STRESS IN HIGH-PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT.

Richard F Stribley, S. A. Nunneley

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cooling of the cockpit in high-performance aircraft is usually based upon avionics requirements, with only secondary regard for the effect on aircrew. A shift in priority may now be needed because the new fighter aircraft demand maximal human performance which may be impaired by heat stress. This paper reviews current USAF specifications for the cockpit environmental control system (ECS) together with evidence that hot-weather flight operations involve significant aircrew heat exposure. A brief analysis is made of heat stress are discussed. A new approach is suggested for writing ECS specifications in order to ensure adequate aircrew protection and optimal man-machine system performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper)
Issue number78 -ENAs-22
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978
Externally publishedYes
EventUnknown conference -
Duration: Jul 10 1978Jul 13 1978

Fingerprint

Aircraft
Control systems
Cockpits (aircraft)
Man machine systems
Specifications
Avionics
Cooling
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

PHYSIOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS : CONTROL OF HEAT STRESS IN HIGH-PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT. / Stribley, Richard F; Nunneley, S. A.

In: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper), No. 78 -ENAs-22, 01.01.1978.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

@article{8ac83b24498a4b7b9bb79a22432c1b67,
title = "PHYSIOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS: CONTROL OF HEAT STRESS IN HIGH-PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT.",
abstract = "Cooling of the cockpit in high-performance aircraft is usually based upon avionics requirements, with only secondary regard for the effect on aircrew. A shift in priority may now be needed because the new fighter aircraft demand maximal human performance which may be impaired by heat stress. This paper reviews current USAF specifications for the cockpit environmental control system (ECS) together with evidence that hot-weather flight operations involve significant aircrew heat exposure. A brief analysis is made of heat stress are discussed. A new approach is suggested for writing ECS specifications in order to ensure adequate aircrew protection and optimal man-machine system performance.",
author = "Stribley, {Richard F} and Nunneley, {S. A.}",
year = "1978",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper)",
issn = "0402-1215",
number = "78 -ENAs-22",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - PHYSIOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

T2 - CONTROL OF HEAT STRESS IN HIGH-PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT.

AU - Stribley, Richard F

AU - Nunneley, S. A.

PY - 1978/1/1

Y1 - 1978/1/1

N2 - Cooling of the cockpit in high-performance aircraft is usually based upon avionics requirements, with only secondary regard for the effect on aircrew. A shift in priority may now be needed because the new fighter aircraft demand maximal human performance which may be impaired by heat stress. This paper reviews current USAF specifications for the cockpit environmental control system (ECS) together with evidence that hot-weather flight operations involve significant aircrew heat exposure. A brief analysis is made of heat stress are discussed. A new approach is suggested for writing ECS specifications in order to ensure adequate aircrew protection and optimal man-machine system performance.

AB - Cooling of the cockpit in high-performance aircraft is usually based upon avionics requirements, with only secondary regard for the effect on aircrew. A shift in priority may now be needed because the new fighter aircraft demand maximal human performance which may be impaired by heat stress. This paper reviews current USAF specifications for the cockpit environmental control system (ECS) together with evidence that hot-weather flight operations involve significant aircrew heat exposure. A brief analysis is made of heat stress are discussed. A new approach is suggested for writing ECS specifications in order to ensure adequate aircrew protection and optimal man-machine system performance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069373808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069373808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference article

AN - SCOPUS:85069373808

JO - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper)

JF - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper)

SN - 0402-1215

IS - 78 -ENAs-22

ER -