Physician gender differences in general and cancer-specific prevention attitudes and practices

Amelie G. Ramirez, Kimberly A. Wildes, Anna Napoles-Springer, Eliseo Perez-Stable, Greg Talavera, Elena Rios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Findings are inconsistent regarding physician gender differences in general prevention practices and cancer-specific attitudes and practices. Methods. We analyzed cross-sectional data from randomly selected physicians (N = 722) to test associations of gender with prevention practices and attitudes. Results. Chi-square analyses (P .05) showed gender differences for 14% (7/49) of the general and cancer-specific practices and attitudes tested. Multivariate analyses revealed that gender significantly (P .05) predicted general prevention practices and cancer-specific attitudes in 4 models. Female gender predicted discussion of physical activity, violence, and use of substances. Male gender predicted belief in effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen screening. Conclusions. Overall, male and female physicians showed more similarities than differences, but physician gender was associated with a number of important general and cancer-specific prevention services. Female physicians were more likely to discuss general health prevention activities than male physicians, especially issues considered sensitive. We discuss implications for research and education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-93
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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