Phenotypical characterisation of the isolated Norfolk Island population focusing on epidemiological indicators of cardiovascular disease

Claire Bellis, Roger M. Hughes, Kimberly N. Begley, Sharon Quinlan, Rod A. Lea, Simon C. Heath, John Blangero, Lyn R. Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Only 193 people from Pitcairn Island, all descended from 9 'Bounty' mutineers and 12 Tahitian women, moved to the uninhabited Norfolk Island in 1856. Our objective was to assess the population of Norfolk Island, several thousand km off the eastern coast of Australia, as a genetic isolate of potential use for cardiovascular disease (CVD) gene mapping. Methods: A total of 602 participants, approximately two thirds of the island's present adult population, were characterized for a panel of CVD risk factors. Statistical power and heritability were calculated. Results: Norfolk Islander's possess an increased prevalence of hypertension, obesity and multiple CVD risk factors when compared to outbred Caucasian populations. 64% of the study participants were descendents of the island's original founder population. Triglycerides, cholesterol, and blood pressures all had heritabilities above 0.2. Conclusions: The Norfolk Island population is a potentially useful genetic isolate for gene mapping studies aimed at identifying CVD risk factor quantitative trait loci (QTL).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-219
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Heredity
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Isolated population
  • Linkage disequilibrium
  • Norfolk island
  • Quantitative trait loci

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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