Personality, stress, coping, and sense of coherence among nephrology nurses in dialysis settings.

S. L. Lewis, P. N. Bonner, M. A. Campbell, C. L. Cooper, A. Willard

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    33 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    The goal of this study was to examine the relationships among personality types, personal and work-related stress, coping resources, and sense of coherence (SOC) among nephrology nurses in dialysis settings. Nurses (n = 49) from 13 dialysis units in New Mexico completed a demographic data form, Perceived and Nursing Stress Scales, SOC Scale, Coping Resources Inventory, and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The results indicated that there was a positive correlation between perceived personal stress and work-related stress, especially work load. Conversely, there were negative correlations between (a) both personal and work-related stress with SOC, and (b) both coping resources and SOC with burnout. High levels of personal and work-related stress were related to inadequate coping resources. Regression analysis indicated that the main contributing factors to emotional exhaustion (a major component of burnout) were low SOC, lack of staff support, personal stress, and heavy work load. Increased utilization of coping resources may facilitate the nurses' management of personal and work-related stressors.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)325-335
    Number of pages11
    JournalANNA journal / American Nephrology Nurses" Association
    Volume21
    Issue number6
    StatePublished - Oct 1 1994

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

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