Persistent effects of a message counter-marketing light cigarettes.Results of a randomized controlled trial

Lynn T. Kozlowski, Ray Palmer, Michele M. Stine, Andrew A. Strasser, Berwood A. Yost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a randomized, controlled trial, a national sample of smokers of Light cigarettes heard by telephone a 'radio message' counter-marketing Light cigarettes. This message caused immediate changes in beliefs. Follow-up telephone interviews were done about 7 months later. The Message Group (N=181) was more likely than the Control Group (N=85) to report that (a) one Light equaled one Regular in tar yield to smokers, (b) Lights did not decrease health risks, and (c) they wanted to give up smoking (P<.05); they did not report greater quitting or intention to quit, or greater knowledge of filter ventilation. Systematic counter-marketing of Lights is recommended. A telephone-based exposure and follow-up procedure could be a good way to study message effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-452
Number of pages6
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Keywords

  • Consumer behavior
  • Marketing
  • Nicotine
  • Tobacco smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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