Perineal pad testing in the quantitation of urinary incontinence

M. D. Walters, R. A. Dombroski, T. J. Prihoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirty-seven women with urodynamically proved genuine stress incontinence underwent 2 hours of perineal pad-weighing and answered a series of questions regarding perception of their incontinence. It was found that 22% of patients had a pad weight of ≤1.0 g after the first hour, compared with 8% for the second hour, and 3% for both hours combined. No association was found between pad weight gain and clinical incontinence severity score. In contrast, answers to simple questions about frequency of leaking episodes and pad use were significantly associated with incontinence severity. Our results indicate that pad-testing is a poor predictor of incontinence severity and provides no improvement in its prediction over answers to simple questions about frequency of leaking episodes and pad use. The high false-negative rate of the 1-hour pad test precludes its use in differentiating continent from incontinent women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-6
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1990

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Urinary Incontinence
Weight Gain
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Pad test
  • Urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Perineal pad testing in the quantitation of urinary incontinence. / Walters, M. D.; Dombroski, R. A.; Prihoda, T. J.

In: International Urogynecology Journal, Vol. 1, No. 1, 03.1990, p. 3-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walters, M. D. ; Dombroski, R. A. ; Prihoda, T. J. / Perineal pad testing in the quantitation of urinary incontinence. In: International Urogynecology Journal. 1990 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 3-6.
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