Patients’ Perspectives of Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain: Treatment Satisfaction, Perceived Utility, and Global Assessment of Change

Gregory P. Beehler, Travis A. Loughran, Paul R. King, Katherine M. Dollar, Jennifer L. Murphy, Lisa K. Kearney, Wade R. Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain (Brief CBT-CP) is a biopsychosocial treatment designed to improve access to nonpharmacological pain care in primary care. Results from a clinical demonstration project in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinics showed rapid improvement in pain outcomes following Brief CBT-CP treatment in Primary Care Behavioral Health (PCBH). As part of this larger project, the current work aimed to understand patients’ perspectives of Brief CBT-CP via a self-report survey completed posttreatment. Method: Thirty-four primary care patients received Brief CBT-CP as part of their usual VHA care and subsequently completed an anonymous survey that included questions regarding treatment modality, intervention content, utility, and satisfaction, as well as global assessment of change in pain-related functioning. Results: Participants reported that Brief CBT-CP content was useful (91%) and that they were satisfied with the intervention overall (89%), including appointment length, frequency of encounters, and comprehensibility of content. On average (M = 4.50, SD = 1.71), participants reported “somewhat better” to “moderately better” pain-related functioning following treatment. Exploratory descriptive analysis indicated that self-reported change in function following treatment may vary by patient characteristics, including gender and opioid use history. Discussion: Patients were receptive to Brief CBT-CP, were satisfied with their experience during treatment, and reported benefit in pain-related functioning after treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-357
Number of pages7
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Mental health services
  • Primary care behavioral health
  • Primary health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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