Pathophysiologic responses of the subhuman primate in experimental septic shock

J. J. Coalson, L. B. Hinshaw, C. A. Guenter, E. L. Berrell, L. J. Greenfield

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39 Scopus citations

Abstract

The grave clinical aspects of septic shock have stimulated the search for an experimental animal model which more closely relates to human pathophysiology. This study of the cardiovascular pulmonary morphologic responses of the baboon to slow infusions of live Escherichia coli organisms was designed to approximate more closely the human clinical entity. Anesthetized young adult baboons received 3 hr intravenous infusions of organisms at an average dosage of 8 x 10 9 organisms per kg body weight. Responses of animals were followed during a period of 6 hr in the anesthetized state. There was progressive systemic hypotension and steadily decreasing cardiac output. Total peripheral resistance was uniformly depressed during infusion, but was variable during the postinfusion survival period. Increases in heart rate, alveolar arterial oxygen tension gradient, and oxygen uptake were uniformly present. These alterations bear close resemblance to those seen in other subhuman primates administered short term doses of live organisms. There were extensive morphologic changes in pulmonary, cardiac, and renal beds. Glomeruli contained multiple fibrin thrombi and disrupted platelets, and the glomerular capillary endothelium was focally edematous and disrupted. The myocardium exhibited capillary endothelial edema and fluid accumulation in interfiber and intrafiber spaces. There were sequstration, degranulation, and fragmentation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and platelets, and characteristic endothelial lesions within the pulmonary vascular bed. Findings demonstrate both cardiovascular pulmonary dysfunction and renal, cardiac, and pulmonary morphologic lesions. The baboon shock model appears to be well suited for studies of experimental septic shock and bears close resemblance to the human clinical entity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-569
Number of pages9
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume32
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1975

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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    Coalson, J. J., Hinshaw, L. B., Guenter, C. A., Berrell, E. L., & Greenfield, L. J. (1975). Pathophysiologic responses of the subhuman primate in experimental septic shock. Laboratory Investigation, 32(4), 561-569.