Pathology of spontaneous air sacculitis in 37 baboons and seven chimpanzees and a brief review of the literature

Shyamesh Kumar, Benjamin Fox, Michael A. Owston, Gene B. Hubbard, Edward J. Dick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Air sacculitis is an important clinical condition in non-human primates. Methods We evaluated 37 baboons and seven chimpanzees with spontaneous air sacculitis submitted to pathology over a 20-year period. Results Air sacculitis was observed almost exclusively in males. Common reported signs were halitosis, coughing, nasal discharges, depression, anorexia, and weight loss. Gross lesions included thickened air sacs and suppurative exudate lining the walls. Microscopic lesions included marked epithelial hyperplasia or hypertrophy, necrosis, fibrosis, cellular infiltrates, and bacterial colonies. Mixed bacterial infections were more common than infections by single species of bacteria. Streptococcus sp. was the most frequent bacteria isolated in both baboons and chimpanzees. Conclusions This is the first report describing the gross and microscopic lesions of air sacculitis in chimpanzees. The preponderance of males suggests a male sex predilection in baboons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-277
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of medical primatology
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Air sac
  • Air sacculitis
  • Non-human primate
  • Pan
  • Papio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pathology of spontaneous air sacculitis in 37 baboons and seven chimpanzees and a brief review of the literature'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this