Pathobiological determinants of atherosclerosis in youth (PDAY): Rationale, methodology, and selected risk factor findings

J. P. Strong, M. C. Oalmann, G. T. Malcom, D. W.P. Newman, C. A. McMahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies showing that the process of atherosclerosis begins in childhood and efforts to control atherosclerotic complications in adults have led to intense interest in the relationship of known risk factors for coronary heart disease to the early changes of atherosclerosis in children, adolescents, and young adults. To address this problem, aortas and right coronary arteries from forensic pathology laboratories in eight communities were evaluated for extent of atherosclerotic lesions. The 638 male subjects included in this report were 15-34 years of age and died of external causes. Age and race data were obtained from death certificates. Postmortem risk factor measures included serum lipoproteins and cholesterol, serum thiocyanate concentrations as a marker for smoking, glycohemoglobin as evidence of diabetes or glucose intolerance, and thickness of panniculus adiposus to evaluate obesity. Age was statistically associated with the percentage of intimal surface involved with all atherosclerotic lesions (total lesions) and raised lesions in both the aorta and the right coronary artery. Blacks had significantly more total lesions than whites. Low density lipoprotein plus very low density lipoprotein cholesterol was associated with total lesions in both arteries and raised lesions in the right coronary. Smoking was associated with both total and raised lesions in the aorta. Thickness of panniculus was associated with both total and raised lesions in the right coronary artery. Glycohemoglobin was associated with total lesions in the right coronary artery. These data provide evidence of the development of atherosclerosis at this early age and relate these lesions to know coronary heart disease risk factors providing a basis for strongly recommending the development of programs to reduce risk factors in young persons to help prevent the clinical manifestation of disease later in life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-30
Number of pages9
JournalCardiovascular Risk Factors
Volume2
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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