Partial cross-validation of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Revised (WMS-R) General Memory - Attention/Concentration Malingering Index in a nonlitigating sample

Robin C. Hilsabeck, Matthew D. Thompson, James W. Irby, Russell L. Adams, James G. Scott, Wm Drew Gouvier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Wechsler Memory Scale - Revised (WMS-R) malingering indices proposed by Mittenberg, Azrin, Millsaps, and Heilbronner [Psychol Assess 5 (1993) 34.] were partially cross-validated in a sample of 200 nonlitigants. Nine diagnostic categories were examined, including participants with traumatic brain injury (TBI), brain tumor, stroke/vascular, senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT), epilepsy, depression/anxiety, medical problems, and no diagnosis. Results showed that the discriminant function using WMS-R subtests misclassified only 6.5% of the sample as malingering, with significantly higher misclassification rates of SDAT and stroke/vascular groups. The General Memory Index - Attention/Concentration Index (GMI-ACI) difference score misclassified only 8.5% of the sample as malingering when a difference score of greater than 25 points was used as the cutoff criterion. No diagnostic group was significantly more likely to be misclassified. Results support the utility of the GMI-ACI difference score, as well as the WMS-R subtest discriminant function score, in detecting malingering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-79
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Malingering
Wechsler Scales
Alzheimer Disease
Stroke
Vascular Dementia
Brain Neoplasms
Blood Vessels
Epilepsy
Anxiety
Depression

Keywords

  • Brain injury
  • Malingering
  • Neuropsychological
  • WMS-R

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Partial cross-validation of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Revised (WMS-R) General Memory - Attention/Concentration Malingering Index in a nonlitigating sample. / Hilsabeck, Robin C.; Thompson, Matthew D.; Irby, James W.; Adams, Russell L.; Scott, James G.; Gouvier, Wm Drew.

In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 71-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hilsabeck, Robin C. ; Thompson, Matthew D. ; Irby, James W. ; Adams, Russell L. ; Scott, James G. ; Gouvier, Wm Drew. / Partial cross-validation of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Revised (WMS-R) General Memory - Attention/Concentration Malingering Index in a nonlitigating sample. In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 2003 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 71-79.
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