Parasexual approaches to the study of human genetic disease

T. G. Lugo, Robin J Leach, R. E K Fournier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have used two different strategies to construct hybrid cells in which specific, individual human chromosomes or fragments thereof are maintained by direct selective pressure. Our first approach was to introduce a drug-resistance gene into human chromosomes using a retroviral vector, and to transfer the marked chromosomes via microcells into mouse cells. The second method was to fuse gamma-irradiated human cells with rodent cells to produce hybrids containing fragments of the human X chromosome. Such hybrid cell lines should greatly facilitate both human gene mapping and the isolation of human genes by molecular cloning. The gene-transfer technologies described here can also be used to construct cell lines in which the expression of genes involved in human diseases can be studied in vitro.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-303
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
VolumeVol. 486
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Inborn Genetic Diseases
Medical Genetics
Chromosomes
Genes
Hybrid Cells
Cells
Human Chromosomes
Chromosomes, Human, X
Gene transfer
Technology Transfer
Cell Line
Chromosome Mapping
Cloning
Molecular Cloning
Electric fuses
Drug Resistance
Rodentia
Gene Expression
Genetic Disease
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Parasexual approaches to the study of human genetic disease. / Lugo, T. G.; Leach, Robin J; Fournier, R. E K.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. Vol. 486, 1986, p. 293-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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