Overview of the Leishmaniavirus endoribonuclease and functions of other endoribonucleases affecting viral gene expression

Kyle J. Macbeth, Jean L. Patterson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Leishmaniaviruses (LRV) are double-stranded RNA viruses that persistently infect some strains of the protozoan parasite Leishmania. The identification of a short viral RNA transcript led to our discovery of an endoribonuclease activity of the LRV capsid protein. Other known endoribonucleases serve a variety of diverse roles in the regulated balance of processing and degradation of both cellular and viral RNAs, thus determining the amount and functionality of specific RNA molecules in a cell at any given time. The consequence of LRV RNA cleavage on the LRV life cycle has not yet been determined. Here we review the LRV endoribonuclease and discuss potential roles for this endoribonuclease activity in the context of the involvement of other endoribonucleases in regulating viral gene expression and replicative capacity.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)254-260
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Experimental Zoology
    Volume282
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1998

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Animal Science and Zoology

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