Occult Radiographically Evident Port-Site Hernia after Robot-Assisted Urologic Surgery: Incidence and Risk Factors

Matthew C. Christie, Jules P. Manger, Abdulaziz M. Khiyami, Afshan A. Ornan, Karen M. Wheeler, Noah S. Schenkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Laparoscopic trocar-site hernias (TSH) are rare, with a reported incidence of 1% or less. The incidence of occult radiographically evident hernias has not been described after robot-assisted urologic surgery. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of this problem. Materials and Methods: A single-institution retrospective review of robot-assisted urologic surgery was performed from April 2009 to December 2012. Patients with preoperative and postoperative CT were included for analysis. Imaging was reviewed by two radiologists and one urologist. Results: One hundred four cases were identified, including 60 partial nephrectomy, 38 prostatectomy, and 6 cystectomy. Mean age was 58 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 29 kg/m2. The cohort was 77% male. Ten total hernias were identified by CT in 8 patients, 2 of which were clinically evident hernias. Excluding these two hernias, occult port-site hernias were identified radiographically in seven patients. Per-patient incidence of occult TSH was 6.7% (7/104), and per-port incidence was 1.4% (8/564). All hernias were midline and 30% contained bowel. Eight of the 10 occurred at 12 mm sites (p = 0.0065) and 3 of the 10 occurred at extended incisions. Age, gender, BMI, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppressive drug therapy, ASA score, procedure, blood loss, prior abdominal surgery, and history of hernia were not significant risk factors. Specimen size >40 g (p = 0.024) and wound infection (p = 0.0052) were significant risk factors. Conclusion: While the incidence of clinically evident port-site hernia remains low in robot-assisted urologic surgery, the incidence of CT-detected occult hernia was 6.7% in this series. These occurred most often in sites extended for specimen extraction and at larger port sites. This suggests more attention should be paid to fascial closure at these sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-96
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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