Occult gastrointestinal bleeding. An evaluation of available diagnostic methods

J. D. Richardson, W. D. McInnis, R. Ramos, J. B. Aust

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Occult gastrointestinal bleeding was defined as continued bleeding in spite of a normal series of X rays of the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, barium enema and sigmoidoscopy. Twenty six such patients were treated. A thorough systematic evaluation, including gastroscopy, colonoscopy, visceral angiography and isotopic scanning, was done preoperatively. Using colonoscopy and arteriography, nearly 60% of the bleeding sites were identified. Seventy six % of the lesions identified were in the terminal part of the ileum or the ascending colon. Exploratory laparotomy should be performed for life threatening hemorrhage or as a diagnostic test only after a thorough preoperative evaluation. If results of a complete preoperative evaluation, including arteriography, were normal, then the likelihood of finding a discrete cause of bleeding at laparotomy was high (80%). A systematic evaluation and diligence of physician and patient in localizing the site of bleeding are essential.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)661-665
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume110
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1975

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Hemorrhage
Angiography
Colonoscopy
Laparotomy
Ascending Colon
Sigmoidoscopy
Gastroscopy
Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
Ileum
Routine Diagnostic Tests
X-Rays
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Richardson, J. D., McInnis, W. D., Ramos, R., & Aust, J. B. (1975). Occult gastrointestinal bleeding. An evaluation of available diagnostic methods. Archives of Surgery, 110(5), 661-665.

Occult gastrointestinal bleeding. An evaluation of available diagnostic methods. / Richardson, J. D.; McInnis, W. D.; Ramos, R.; Aust, J. B.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 110, No. 5, 1975, p. 661-665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richardson, JD, McInnis, WD, Ramos, R & Aust, JB 1975, 'Occult gastrointestinal bleeding. An evaluation of available diagnostic methods', Archives of Surgery, vol. 110, no. 5, pp. 661-665.
Richardson JD, McInnis WD, Ramos R, Aust JB. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding. An evaluation of available diagnostic methods. Archives of Surgery. 1975;110(5):661-665.
Richardson, J. D. ; McInnis, W. D. ; Ramos, R. ; Aust, J. B. / Occult gastrointestinal bleeding. An evaluation of available diagnostic methods. In: Archives of Surgery. 1975 ; Vol. 110, No. 5. pp. 661-665.
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