Objective evaluation of physical function in patients with advanced lung cancer: A preliminary report

Maria Montoya, Frank Fossella, J. Lynn Palmer, Guddi Kaur, Ellen A. Pace, Rajesh Yadav, Maureen Simmonds, Theresa Gillis, Eduardo Bruera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: This prospective study was designed in order to compare the most common subjective measurements of physical function in patients with advanced lung cancer with an objective physical functional test (Simmonds Functional Assessment Tool [SFA]). Patients and Methods: One hundred patients agreed to participate and complete the study before or after their outpatient medical oncology appointment. Patients underwent assessment using the Karnofsky, the Brief fatigue Inventory, The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung patients (FACT-L) and the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS). These results were compared to the SFA tool. The SFA consists of six tasks: tying a belt, putting coins in a cup, reaching above head, standing up/sitting down, reaching forward and walking 50 feet. Results: Ninety-nine patients completed the study over 8 months: median Karnofsky performance status was 85 (70 to 100), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) score (0 to 10) was generally low (0.5 to 2.8). SFA scores were significantly different in patients compared to a control group. The correlation between the subscales of the SFA and the Karnofsky, the Brief Fatigue Inventory, The FACT-L and the ESAS was generally low to moderate (r values: 0.22 to 0.38). There was generally a moderate correlation between the different subjective scales (r values: 0.3 to 0.62). Conclusion: Adherence to the SFA tool was excellent. The low to moderate correlation between the abnormalities found in the objective SFA and the subjective fatigue tests suggest that objective evaluation of the functional capacity provides a potentially useful and independent end-point for clinical trials and therapeutic interventions. These assessment tools should be used complementary to each other to better assess the functional status of patients with advanced lung cancer. Large trials of objective functional assessment are justified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-316
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Lung Neoplasms
Symptom Assessment
Fatigue
Karnofsky Performance Status
Equipment and Supplies
Numismatics
Medical Oncology
Walking
Appointments and Schedules
Outpatients
Therapeutics
Head
Clinical Trials
Prospective Studies
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Montoya, M., Fossella, F., Palmer, J. L., Kaur, G., Pace, E. A., Yadav, R., ... Bruera, E. (2006). Objective evaluation of physical function in patients with advanced lung cancer: A preliminary report. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 9(2), 309-316. https://doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2006.9.309

Objective evaluation of physical function in patients with advanced lung cancer : A preliminary report. / Montoya, Maria; Fossella, Frank; Palmer, J. Lynn; Kaur, Guddi; Pace, Ellen A.; Yadav, Rajesh; Simmonds, Maureen; Gillis, Theresa; Bruera, Eduardo.

In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 2, 04.2006, p. 309-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Montoya, M, Fossella, F, Palmer, JL, Kaur, G, Pace, EA, Yadav, R, Simmonds, M, Gillis, T & Bruera, E 2006, 'Objective evaluation of physical function in patients with advanced lung cancer: A preliminary report', Journal of Palliative Medicine, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 309-316. https://doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2006.9.309
Montoya, Maria ; Fossella, Frank ; Palmer, J. Lynn ; Kaur, Guddi ; Pace, Ellen A. ; Yadav, Rajesh ; Simmonds, Maureen ; Gillis, Theresa ; Bruera, Eduardo. / Objective evaluation of physical function in patients with advanced lung cancer : A preliminary report. In: Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 309-316.
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