Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in Minorities in the United States

Janette S. Carter, Jacqueline A Pugh, Ana Monterrosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

389 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To review the available information on prevalence, complications, and mortality of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and primary and secondary prevention activities in black persons, Hispanic persons, Native Americans, and Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. Data Source: MEDLINE search from 1976 to 1994 through the PlusNet search system. Study Selection: Use of the key words non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the names of each specific minority group, socioeconomic status, acculturation, genetics, diet, complications, mortality, treatment, and intervention (lifestyle or medication) produced 290 unduplicated articles. Additional articles cited in the original articles were also included. Data Extraction: Risk factors, incidence, prevalence, complications, and mortality of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Data Synthesis: All minorities, except natives of Alaska, have a prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus that is two to six times greater than that of white persons. Most studies show an increased prevalence of nephropathy that can be as much as six times higher than that of white persons. Retinopathy has variably higher rates in black persons, Hispanic persons, and Native Americans. Amputations are done more frequently among black persons than among white persons (9.0 per 1000 compared with 6.3 per 1000), and Pima Indians have 3.7 times more amputations than do white persons. Diabetes-related mortality is higher for minorities than for white persons, and the rate is increasing. The relative importance of genetic heritage, diet, exercise, socioeconomic status, culture, language, and access to health care in the prevalence, incidence, and mortality of diabetes is not clear. Studies of interventions in minority populations are in progress. Conclusion: Diabetes should be treated as a public health problem for minority populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-232
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume125
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 1 1996

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Mortality
North American Indians
Amputation
Hispanic Americans
Social Class
Diet
Potassium Iodide
Acculturation
Minority Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Information Storage and Retrieval
Incidence
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
MEDLINE
Population
Names
Life Style
Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Carter, J. S., Pugh, J. A., & Monterrosa, A. (1996). Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in Minorities in the United States. Annals of Internal Medicine, 125(3), 221-232.

Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in Minorities in the United States. / Carter, Janette S.; Pugh, Jacqueline A; Monterrosa, Ana.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 125, No. 3, 01.08.1996, p. 221-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carter, JS, Pugh, JA & Monterrosa, A 1996, 'Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in Minorities in the United States', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 125, no. 3, pp. 221-232.
Carter, Janette S. ; Pugh, Jacqueline A ; Monterrosa, Ana. / Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in Minorities in the United States. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 125, No. 3. pp. 221-232.
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