Nocturnal bruxism and temporomandibular disorders.

John D Rugh, J. Harlan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

182 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter has discussed the important aspects of nocturnal bruxism and its relation to disorders of the masticatory system and headaches. Bruxism is believed to be a stress-related sleep disorder, occurring in both men and women, in children, and in adults. In most patients, bruxism results only in minor tooth wear; however, it can become extremely severe with damage occurring in essentially every part of the masticatory apparatus. Nocturnal bruxism should not be overlooked as an etiologic factor in muscular headaches. Short-term acute therapy may involve physical therapy, nocturnal electromyographic biofeedback, and medication to relieve anxiety and improve sleep. Long-term management usually includes some form of stress reduction, change in lifestyle, and an occlusal splint or nightguard to protect the teeth and masticatory system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-341
Number of pages13
JournalAdvances in neurology
Volume49
StatePublished - 1988

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Sleep Bruxism
Bruxism
Stomatognathic System
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Headache
Occlusal Splints
Tooth Wear
Life Style
Tooth
Sleep
Anxiety
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nocturnal bruxism and temporomandibular disorders. / Rugh, John D; Harlan, J.

In: Advances in neurology, Vol. 49, 1988, p. 329-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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