No more pens: what the 2009 Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturer's Association code changes really mean

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

In 2002, new guidelines for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry and physicians were published as an official code of conduct. Adherence to the guidelines was voluntary, and there were no provisions for discipline to companies who did not subscribe to the code or who subscribed but did not comply. Many of the code standards are routinely violated, sometimes egregiously, with many violations on easy display at national professional meetings. In response to further problems and complaints, tougher code standards-now famous for the specific ban on logo pens and coffee cups-were adopted in 2009. Subscription to the new code is voluntary, and there are no provisions for discipline or punishment for those companies who chose not to subscribe or who may violate its standards.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-349
Number of pages4
JournalClinics in Dermatology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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