New Nurses’ Experience with Lateral Violence and Their Decision to Remain in Nursing

Lorraine A. Hover, Gail B. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lateral violence or bullying in nursing is the antithesis of caring and a profound, pervasive global concern. Survivors of lateral violence exhibit significant negative emotional and physical effects. Approximately one-third of new nurses leave the profession within the first 3 years of practice, citing lateral violence as a determining factor. This study explored the reasons new nurses decided to remain in the profession despite their experiences. Through one-on-one interviews (N = 9), the lived experiences were explored. Six themes emerged: the patients, needed the experience, I got counseling, there was an end, I cried, and nothing changed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-208
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal for Human Caring
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • bullying
  • caring
  • lateral violence
  • new nurses
  • phenomenology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Care Planning
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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