Neurometabolite effects of response to quetiapine and placebo in adolescents with bipolar depression

Kiki Chang, Melissa DelBello, Wen Jang Chu, Amy Garrett, Ryan Kelley, Neil Mills, Meghan Howe, Holly Bryan, Cal Adler, Jim Eliassen, Daniel Spielman, Stephen M. Strakowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Mood stabilizers have been reported to affect brain concentrations of myo-inositol (mI) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA). We examined the effects of quetiapine (QUET), an atypical antipsychotic, on these neurochemicals, and potential predictors of response to QUET in adolescents with bipolar depression. Methods: Twenty-six adolescents with bipolar depression participated in an 8-week placebo-controlled trial of QUET monotherapy. Subjects were scanned at baseline and after 8 weeks with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 3T and 4T at two sites, with 8cm3 voxels placed in the right and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). LCModel was used to calculate absolute concentrations of NAA and mI. Results: Twenty-six subjects had pre- and posttreatment scans (mean age=15.6 years, 9 boys). Of these subjects, 5 out of 16 subjects receiving QUET and 5 out of 10 receiving placebo (PBO) were responders (50% decrease in Children's Depression Rating Scale [CDRS] score). Although baseline ACC mI did not predict responder status, responders had significantly lower posttreatment ACC mI values than did nonresponders (3.27±.71 vs. 4.23±.70; p=0.004). There were no significant differences in the changes in ACC and DLPFC NAA levels in the QUET group compared with the PBO group (ACC: -0.55±1.3 vs.+0.25±1.5, p=0.23; right-DLPFC: -0.55±1.3 vs. 0.33±0.89, p=0.13; left-DLPFC: -0.04±0.91 vs.+0.29±0.61, p=0.41). Conclusion: We found that posttreatment, not baseline, ACC mI levels were associated with response to QUET in adolescents with bipolar depression. There were no differences in NAA concentration changes between the QUET and PBO groups. Larger studies including different brain regions would help to clarify the effects of QUET on neurochemistry in patients with bipolar disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-268
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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