Neural networks related to dysfunctional face processing in autism spectrum disorder

Thomas Nickl-Jockschat, Claudia Rottschy, Johanna Thommes, Frank Schneider, Angela R. Laird, Peter T. Fox, Simon B. Eickhoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

One of the most consistent neuropsychological findings in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a reduced interest in and impaired processing of human faces. We conducted an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on 14 functional imaging studies on neural correlates of face processing enrolling a total of 164 ASD patients. Subsequently, normative whole-brain functional connectivity maps for the identified regions of significant convergence were computed for the task-independent (resting-state) and task-dependent (co-activations) state in healthy subjects. Quantitative functional decoding was performed by reference to the BrainMap database. Finally, we examined the overlap of the delineated network with the results of a previous meta-analysis on structural abnormalities in ASD as well as with brain regions involved in human action observation/imitation. We found a single cluster in the left fusiform gyrus showing significantly reduced activation during face processing in ASD across all studies. Both task-dependent and task-independent analyses indicated significant functional connectivity of this region with the temporo-occipital and lateral occipital cortex, the inferior frontal and parietal cortices, the thalamus and the amygdala. Quantitative reverse inference then indicated an association of these regions mainly with face processing, affective processing, and language-related tasks. Moreover, we found that the cortex in the region of right area V5 displaying structural changes in ASD patients showed consistent connectivity with the region showing aberrant responses in the context of face processing. Finally, this network was also implicated in the human action observation/imitation network. In summary, our findings thus suggest a functionally and structurally disturbed network of occipital regions related primarily to face (but potentially also language) processing, which interact with inferior frontal as well as limbic regions and may be the core of aberrant face processing and reduced interest in faces in ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2355-2371
Number of pages17
JournalBrain Structure and Function
Volume220
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2015

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Autism spectrum disorders
  • Face processing
  • Fusiform face area
  • Meta-analysis
  • V5

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Histology

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