Multi-modal intervention for the inpatient management of sickle cell pain significantly decreases the rate of acute chest syndrome

Mary M. Reagan, Michael R. DeBaun, Melissa J Frei-jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Pain in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) is the leading cause of acute care visits and hospitalizations. Pain episodes are a risk factor for the development of acute chest syndrome (ACS), contributing to morbidity and mortality in SCD. Few strategies exist to prevent this complication.Methods: We performed a before-and-after prospective multi-modal intervention. All children with SCD admitted for pain during the 2-year study period were eligible. The multi-modal intervention included standardized admission orders, monthly house staff education, and one-on-one patient and caregiver education.Results: A total of 332 admissions for pain occurred during the study period; 159 before the intervention and 173 during the intervention. The ACS rate declined by 50% during the intervention period 25% (39 of 159) to 12% (21 of 173); P-=-0.003. Time to ACS development increased from 0.8 days (0.03-5.2) to 1.7 days (0.03-5.8); P-=-0.047. No significant difference was found in patient demographics, intravenous fluid amount administered, frequency of normal saline bolus administration, or cumulative opioid amount delivered in the first 24-hr. Patient controlled analgesia-use was more common after the intervention 52% (82 of 159) versus 73% (126 of 173; P-=-0.0001) and fewer patients required changes in analgesic dosing within the first 24-hr after admission (26%, 42 of 159 vs. 16%, 28 of 173; P-=-0.015).Conclusions: A multi-modal intervention to educate and subsequently change physician's behavior likely decreased the rate of ACS in the setting of a single teaching hospital.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-266
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acute Chest Syndrome
Inpatients
Sickle Cell Anemia
Pain
Patient-Controlled Analgesia
Patient Education
Internship and Residency
Teaching Hospitals
Opioid Analgesics
Caregivers
Analgesics
Hospitalization
Demography
Morbidity
Physicians
Education
Mortality

Keywords

  • Acute chest syndrome
  • Children
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Sickle cell pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology

Cite this

Multi-modal intervention for the inpatient management of sickle cell pain significantly decreases the rate of acute chest syndrome. / Reagan, Mary M.; DeBaun, Michael R.; Frei-jones, Melissa J.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 56, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 262-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reagan, Mary M. ; DeBaun, Michael R. ; Frei-jones, Melissa J. / Multi-modal intervention for the inpatient management of sickle cell pain significantly decreases the rate of acute chest syndrome. In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2011 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 262-266.
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