Multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics and the altered lipids at the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

100 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics (MDMS-SL) is a well-developed technology for global lipid analysis, which identifies and quantifies individual lipid molecular species directly from lipid extracts of biological samples. By using this technology, we have revealed three marked changes of lipids in brain samples of subjects with mild cognitive impairment of Alzheimer's disease including sulfatides, ceramides, and plasmalogens. Further studies using MDMS-SL lead us to the identification of the potential biochemical mechanisms responsible for the altered lipids at the disease state, which are thoroughly discussed in this minireview. Specifically, in studies to identify the causes responsible for sulfatide depletion at the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease, we have found that apolipoprotein E is associated with sulfatide transport and mediates sulfatide homeostasis in the nervous system through lipoprotein metabolism pathways and that alterations in apolipoprotein E-mediated sulfatide trafficking can lead to sulfatide depletion in the brain. Collectively, the results obtained from lipidomic analyses of brain samples provide important insights into the biochemical mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)774-783
Number of pages10
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids
Volume1801
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Apolipoprotein E
  • Ceramide
  • Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry
  • Plasmalogen
  • Shotgun lipidomics
  • Sulfatide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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