Mucoid impactions: Finger-in-glove sign and other CT and radiographic features

Santiago Martinez, Laura E. Heyneman, H. Page McAdams, Santiago E. Rossi, Carlos S Restrepo, Andres Eraso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mucoid impaction is a relatively common finding at chest radiography and computed tomography (CT). Both congenital and acquired abnormalities may cause mucoid impaction of the large airways that often manifests as tubular opacities known as the finger-in-glove sign. The congenital conditions in which this sign most often appears are segmental bronchial atresia and cystic fibrosis. The sign also may be observed in many acquired conditions, include inflammatory and infectious diseases (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, broncholithiasis, and foreign body aspiration), benign neoplastic processes (bronchial hamartoma, lipoma, and papillomatosis), and malignancies (bronchogenic carcinoma, carcinoid tumor, and metastases). To point to the correct diagnosis, the radiologist must be familiar with the key radiographic and CT features that enable differentiation among the various likely causes. CT is more useful than chest radiography for differentiating between mucoid impaction and other disease processes, such as arteriovenous malformation, and for directing further diagnostic evaluation. In addition, knowledge of the patient's medical history, clinical symptoms and signs, and predisposing factors is important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1369-1382
Number of pages14
JournalRadiographics
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

X Ray Tomography
Radiography
Fingers
Thorax
Tomography
Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis
Neoplastic Processes
Hamartoma
Bronchogenic Carcinoma
Lipoma
Arteriovenous Malformations
Carcinoid Tumor
Papilloma
Foreign Bodies
Cystic Fibrosis
Causality
Signs and Symptoms
Communicable Diseases
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Martinez, S., Heyneman, L. E., Page McAdams, H., Rossi, S. E., Restrepo, C. S., & Eraso, A. (2009). Mucoid impactions: Finger-in-glove sign and other CT and radiographic features. Radiographics, 28(5), 1369-1382. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.285075212

Mucoid impactions : Finger-in-glove sign and other CT and radiographic features. / Martinez, Santiago; Heyneman, Laura E.; Page McAdams, H.; Rossi, Santiago E.; Restrepo, Carlos S; Eraso, Andres.

In: Radiographics, Vol. 28, No. 5, 04.2009, p. 1369-1382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martinez, S, Heyneman, LE, Page McAdams, H, Rossi, SE, Restrepo, CS & Eraso, A 2009, 'Mucoid impactions: Finger-in-glove sign and other CT and radiographic features', Radiographics, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 1369-1382. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.285075212
Martinez S, Heyneman LE, Page McAdams H, Rossi SE, Restrepo CS, Eraso A. Mucoid impactions: Finger-in-glove sign and other CT and radiographic features. Radiographics. 2009 Apr;28(5):1369-1382. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.285075212
Martinez, Santiago ; Heyneman, Laura E. ; Page McAdams, H. ; Rossi, Santiago E. ; Restrepo, Carlos S ; Eraso, Andres. / Mucoid impactions : Finger-in-glove sign and other CT and radiographic features. In: Radiographics. 2009 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 1369-1382.
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