Motor learning, neuroplasticity, and strength and skill training: Moving from compensation to retraining in behavioral management of dysphagia

Emily Zimmerman, Giselle Carnaby, Cathy L. Lazarus, Georgia A. Malandraki

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Learning a motor skill and regaining a motor skill after it is lost are key tenets to the field of speech-language pathology. Motor learning and relearning have many theoretical underpinnings that serve as a foundation for our clinical practice. This review article applies selective motor learning theories and principles to feeding and swallowing across the life span. Conclusion: In reviewing these theoretical fundamentals, clinical exemplars surrounding the roles of strength, skill, experience, compensation, and retraining, and their influence on motor learning and plasticity in regard to swallowing/feeding skills throughout the life span are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1065-1077
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume29
Issue number2S
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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