Molecular heterogeneity of Acinetobacter baumanii isolates during seasonal increase in prevalence.

C. Christie, D. Mazon, W. Hierholzer, Jan E Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study the epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumanii during a period of increased seasonal prevalence. DESIGN: Descriptive molecular and clinical epidemiologic study of A baumanii isolates from 1990 through 1992. SETTING: A 770-bed urban, acute, tertiary-care university hospital. RESULTS: During 1990 through 1992, the rate of A baumanii isolations was 30.4 per 1,000 culture isolations during the summer, compared to 12.6 per 1,000 culture isolations during the fall, winter, and spring (P < .000001). There were 320 isolates identified among 260 patients during this time. Eighty-one patients with isolates available were identified for evaluation; they ranged in age from 2 months to 95 years. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing showed that 59 (83%) of 71 typed isolates had distinct PFGE patterns. There were three small clusters of isolates with the same PFGE patterns, suggesting cross-transmission in those instances. CONCLUSIONS: A seasonally increased prevalence of A baumanii largely associated with device-related nosocomial infections in severely ill patients was noted over a 3-year period. Although there were isolated instances of cross-transmission, most isolates had distinct PFGE patterns. Clonal dissemination of a single strain was not responsible for the seasonal increased prevalence of A baumanii. PFGE typing was useful in directing control efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)590-594
Number of pages5
JournalInfection control and hospital epidemiology : the official journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America
Volume16
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Acinetobacter
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Tertiary Healthcare
Cross Infection
Epidemiologic Studies
Epidemiology
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Molecular heterogeneity of Acinetobacter baumanii isolates during seasonal increase in prevalence.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To study the epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumanii during a period of increased seasonal prevalence. DESIGN: Descriptive molecular and clinical epidemiologic study of A baumanii isolates from 1990 through 1992. SETTING: A 770-bed urban, acute, tertiary-care university hospital. RESULTS: During 1990 through 1992, the rate of A baumanii isolations was 30.4 per 1,000 culture isolations during the summer, compared to 12.6 per 1,000 culture isolations during the fall, winter, and spring (P < .000001). There were 320 isolates identified among 260 patients during this time. Eighty-one patients with isolates available were identified for evaluation; they ranged in age from 2 months to 95 years. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing showed that 59 (83{\%}) of 71 typed isolates had distinct PFGE patterns. There were three small clusters of isolates with the same PFGE patterns, suggesting cross-transmission in those instances. CONCLUSIONS: A seasonally increased prevalence of A baumanii largely associated with device-related nosocomial infections in severely ill patients was noted over a 3-year period. Although there were isolated instances of cross-transmission, most isolates had distinct PFGE patterns. Clonal dissemination of a single strain was not responsible for the seasonal increased prevalence of A baumanii. PFGE typing was useful in directing control efforts.",
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AU - Christie, C.

AU - Mazon, D.

AU - Hierholzer, W.

AU - Patterson, Jan E

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AB - OBJECTIVE: To study the epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumanii during a period of increased seasonal prevalence. DESIGN: Descriptive molecular and clinical epidemiologic study of A baumanii isolates from 1990 through 1992. SETTING: A 770-bed urban, acute, tertiary-care university hospital. RESULTS: During 1990 through 1992, the rate of A baumanii isolations was 30.4 per 1,000 culture isolations during the summer, compared to 12.6 per 1,000 culture isolations during the fall, winter, and spring (P < .000001). There were 320 isolates identified among 260 patients during this time. Eighty-one patients with isolates available were identified for evaluation; they ranged in age from 2 months to 95 years. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing showed that 59 (83%) of 71 typed isolates had distinct PFGE patterns. There were three small clusters of isolates with the same PFGE patterns, suggesting cross-transmission in those instances. CONCLUSIONS: A seasonally increased prevalence of A baumanii largely associated with device-related nosocomial infections in severely ill patients was noted over a 3-year period. Although there were isolated instances of cross-transmission, most isolates had distinct PFGE patterns. Clonal dissemination of a single strain was not responsible for the seasonal increased prevalence of A baumanii. PFGE typing was useful in directing control efforts.

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