Molecular cloning and functional expression of mouse connexin-30, a gap junction gene highly expressed in adult brain and skin

Edgar Dahl, Dieter Manthey, Ye Chen, Hans Jürgen Schwarz, Young Sook Chang, Peter A. Lalley, Bruce J. Nicholson, Klaus Willecke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

165 Scopus citations

Abstract

A new gap junction gene isolated from the mouse genome codes for a connexin protein of 261 amino acids. Because of its theoretical molecular mass of 30.366 kDa, it is named connexin-30. Within the connexin gene family, this protein is most closely related to connexin-26 (77% amino acid sequence identity). The coding region of mouse connexin-30 is uninterrupted by introns and is detected in the mouse genome as a single copy gene that is assigned to mouse chromosome 14 by analysis of mouse x hamster somatic cell hybrids. Abundant amounts of connexin-30 mRNA (two transcripts of 2.0 and 2.3 kilobase pairs) were found after 4 weeks of postnatal development in mouse brain and skin. Microinjection of connexin-30 cRNA into Xenopus oocytes induced formation of functional gap junction channels that gated somewhat asymmetrically in response to transjunctional voltage and at significantly lower voltage (V(o) = +38 and -46 mV) than the closely homologous connexin- 26 channels (V(o) = 89 mV). Heterotypic pairings of connexin-30 with connexin-26 and connexin-32 produced channels with highly asymmetric and rectifying voltage gating, respectively. This suggests that the polarity of voltage gating and the cationic selectivity of connexin-30 are similar to those of its closest homologue, connexin-26.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17903-17910
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume271
Issue number30
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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