Microbiologic and serologic studies of Gardnerella vaginalis in intra-amniotic infection

R. S. Gibbs, Marc H Weiner, K. Walmer, P. J. St. Clair

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Abstract

Our objective was to investigate the role of Gardnerella vaginalis in intra-amniotic infection by use of comparative, quantitative cultures on selective media and by detection of maternal antibody response. Amniotic fluid was collected from patients with intra-amniotic infection and from matched control women. In addition to media for aerobes, anaerobes, and mycoplasmas, we used V agar-selective (Remel, Lenexa, KS) to isolate G vaginalis. Acute and convalescent maternal sera were collected and assayed for antibodies by a microenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prepared against whole cells of G vaginalis. Gardnerella vaginalis was isolated in the amniotic fluid of 24 (28%) of the 86 patients with intra-amniotic infection, but this was not significantly different from the isolation rate in amniotic fluid of 86 matched controls (21%). No patient exhibited G vaginalis bacteremia. The ELISA performed on paired sera of selected patients showed that 25 had intraamniotic infection (eight G vaginalis-positive, 17 negative), and 18 were asymptomatic (seven G vaginalis-positive, 11 negative). The amount of G vaginalis antibodies detected by ELISA in acute sera was similar in all four groups. Mean changes during convalenscence were small (.053-.084 optical density units) and not significantly different. Although G vaginalis is found commonly in amniotic fluid of patients with intra-amniotic infection, the data do not support a pathogenic role for this organism; however, a facilitating role in polymicrobial infection cannot be excluded.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-190
Number of pages4
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1987

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Gardnerella vaginalis
Amniotic Fluid
Infection
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Serum
Mothers
Immunosorbents
Gastrin-Secreting Cells
Antibodies
Mycoplasma
Infection Control
Bacteremia
Coinfection
Agar
Antibody Formation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Microbiologic and serologic studies of Gardnerella vaginalis in intra-amniotic infection. / Gibbs, R. S.; Weiner, Marc H; Walmer, K.; St. Clair, P. J.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1987, p. 187-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gibbs, R. S. ; Weiner, Marc H ; Walmer, K. ; St. Clair, P. J. / Microbiologic and serologic studies of Gardnerella vaginalis in intra-amniotic infection. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1987 ; Vol. 70, No. 2. pp. 187-190.
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