Mediating Role of Acculturation and Lifestyle Behaviors on Cardiometabolic Risk Among a National Sample of U.S. Asian Indians

Nitha Mathew Joseph, Ranjita Misra, Jing Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Asian Indians are the third largest and fastest growing Asian subgroup in the U.S. and have high risks for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study explored the mediating role of lifestyle behaviors on the relationship between acculturation and cardiometabolic risk factors among Asian Indians using the Diabetes in Indian Americans national study. The cross-sectional study sample comprised 1038 randomly selected adult Asian Indians in seven U.S. sites. Acculturation was assessed using the Acculturation Scale for Southeast Asians. Diet and lifestyle behaviors were measured using the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II subscales. Path analyses with bootstrap methods were conducted. Dietary behavior significantly mediated the relationship between acculturation and HbA1C (β = 0.004, p = 0.047), and physical activity mediated the relationship between acculturation and HDL (β = 0.08, p = 0.011). Other mediation models were not significant (p > 0.05). Mediating factors besides lifestyle behaviors should be explored in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-735
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Culture
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Dietary habits
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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