Matrix-bound Cyr61/CCN1 is required to retain the properties of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell niche but is depleted with aging

Milos Marinkovic, Qiuxia Dai, Aaron O. Gonzalez, Olivia N. Tran, Travis J. Block, Stephen E. Harris, Adam B. Salmon, Chih Ko Yeh, David D. Dean, Xiao Dong Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previously, we showed that extracellular matrices (ECMs), produced ex vivo by various types of stromal cells, direct bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in a tissue-specific manner and recapitulate physiologic changes characteristic of the aging microenvironment. In particular, BM-MSCs obtained from elderly donors and cultured on ECM produced by young BM stromal cells showed improved quantity, quality and osteogenic differentiation. In the present study, we searched for matrix components that are required for a functional BM-MSC niche by comparing ECMs produced by BM stromal cells from “young” (≤25 y/o) versus “elderly” (≥60 y/o) donors. With increasing donor age, ECM fibrillar organization and mechanical integrity deteriorated, along with the ability to promote BM-MSC proliferation and responsiveness to growth factors. Proteomic analyses revealed that the matricellular protein, Cyr61/CCN1, was present in young, but undetectable in elderly, BM-ECM. To assess the role of Cyr61 in the BM-MSC niche, we used genetic methods to down-regulate the incorporation of Cyr61 during production of young ECM and up-regulate its incorporation in elderly ECM. The results showed that Cyr61-depleted young ECM lost the ability to promote BM-MSC proliferation and growth factor responsiveness. However, up-regulating the incorporation of Cyr61 during synthesis of elderly ECM restored its ability to support BM-MSC responsiveness to osteogenic factors such as BMP-2 and IGF-1. We next examined aging bone and compared bone mineral density and Cyr61 content of L4-L5 vertebral bodies in “young” (9–11 m/o) and “elderly” (21–33 m/o) mice. Our analyses showed that low bone mineral density was associated with decreased amounts of Cyr61 in osseous tissue of elderly versus young mice. Our results strongly demonstrate a novel role for ECM-bound Cyr61 in the BM-MSC niche, where it is responsible for retention of BM-MSC proliferation and growth factor responsiveness, while depletion of Cyr61 from the BM niche contributes to an aging-related dysregulation of BM-MSCs. Our results also suggest new potential therapeutic targets for treating age-related bone loss by restoring specific ECM components to the stem cell niche.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-132
Number of pages25
JournalMatrix Biology
Volume111
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Bone microenvironment
  • Cyr61/CCN1
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Osteogenic differentiation
  • Stem cell niche

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Matrix-bound Cyr61/CCN1 is required to retain the properties of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell niche but is depleted with aging'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this