Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy

Peter W. Nathanielsz, Jian Yan, Ralph Green, Mark J Nijland, Joshua W. Miller, Guoyao Wu, Thomas J. McDonald, Marie A. Caudill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maternal intake of dietary methyl-micronutrients (e.g. folate, choline, betaine and vitamin B-12) during pregnancy is essential for normal maternal and fetal methionine metabolism, and is critical for important metabolic processes including those involved in developmental programming. Maternal obesity and nutrient excess during pregnancy influence developmental programming potentially predisposing adult offspring to a variety of chronic health problems. In the present study, we hypothesized that maternal obesity would dysregulate the maternal and fetal methionine cycle. To test this hypothesis, we developed a nulliparous baboon obesity model fed a high fat, high energy diet (HF-HED) prior to and during gestation, and examined methionine cycle biomarkers (e.g., circulating concentrations of homocysteine, methionine, choline, betaine, key amino acids, folate, and vitamin B-12). Animals were group housed allowing full physical activity and social interaction. Maternal prepregnancy percent body fat was 5% in controls and 19% in HF-HED mothers, while fetal weight was 16% lower in offspring of HF-HED mothers at term. Maternal and fetal homocysteine were higher, while maternal and fetal vitamin B-12 and betaine were lower in the HF-HED group. Elevations in circulating maternal folate were evident in the HF-HED group indicating impaired folate metabolism (methyl-trap) as a consequence of maternal vitamin B-12 depletion. Finally, fetal methionine, glycine, serine, and taurine were lower in the HF-HED fetuses. These data show that maternal obesity disturbs the methionine cycle in primate pregnancy, providing a mechanism for the epigenetic changes observed among obese pregnant women and suggesting diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities in human pregnancies complicated by obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12564
JournalPhysiological Reports
Volume3
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Papio
Methionine
Obesity
Mothers
Pregnancy
High Fat Diet
Vitamin B 12
Betaine
Folic Acid
Homocysteine
Choline
Fetal Weight
Micronutrients
Taurine
Adult Children
Interpersonal Relations
Epigenomics
Glycine
Serine
Primates

Keywords

  • Baboon
  • folate
  • maternal obesity
  • methionine cycle
  • vitamin B-12, one-carbon metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physiology

Cite this

Nathanielsz, P. W., Yan, J., Green, R., Nijland, M. J., Miller, J. W., Wu, G., ... Caudill, M. A. (2015). Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy. Physiological Reports, 3(11), [e12564]. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.12564

Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy. / Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Yan, Jian; Green, Ralph; Nijland, Mark J; Miller, Joshua W.; Wu, Guoyao; McDonald, Thomas J.; Caudill, Marie A.

In: Physiological Reports, Vol. 3, No. 11, e12564, 01.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nathanielsz, PW, Yan, J, Green, R, Nijland, MJ, Miller, JW, Wu, G, McDonald, TJ & Caudill, MA 2015, 'Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy', Physiological Reports, vol. 3, no. 11, e12564. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.12564
Nathanielsz, Peter W. ; Yan, Jian ; Green, Ralph ; Nijland, Mark J ; Miller, Joshua W. ; Wu, Guoyao ; McDonald, Thomas J. ; Caudill, Marie A. / Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy. In: Physiological Reports. 2015 ; Vol. 3, No. 11.
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