Mannitol and glucose - Effects on gastric acid secretion and endogenous gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP)

Thomas M. O'Dorisio, James T. Spaeth, Edward W. Martin, Kenneth R. Sirinek, Neil R. Thomford, Ernest L. Mazzaferri, Samuel Cataland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Serum gastric inhibitory polypeptide was measured in dogs prepared with Heidenhain pouches and Mann-Bollman fistulae following the intraduodenal (ID) infusion of isotonic saline, 20% glucose, or 20% mannitol. Following ID 20% glucose, serum GIP concentrations rose significantly (P<0.05) between 30 and 120 min and there was a significant inhibition (P<0.05) of acid secretion in the Heidenhain pouches between 15 and 75 min. A good correlation (r=0.925) was found between the rise in serum GIP and the inhibition of acid secretion. Although neither ID isotonic saline nor 20% mannitol stimulated GIP release, the latter produced a significant (P<0.05) inhibition of acid secretion between 60 and 105 min. We conclude: (1) the inhibitory effect of acid secretion following ID glucose is mediated in part by the release of endogenous GIP; (2) glucose and mannitol probably inhibit gastric acid secretion by different mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1079-1083
Number of pages5
JournalThe American Journal of Digestive Diseases
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1978
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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