Male Gender Role Conflict, Sexual Harassment Tolerance, and the Efficacy of a Psychoeducative Training Program

Lisa K. Kearney, Aaron B. Rochlen, Eden B. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the relationship of gender role conflict, harassment tolerance, and the effectiveness of a harassment training program. Men (n = 98) were randomly assigned to either a training or no-training condition and were shown a video depicting harassment between a professor and a student. As anticipated, men with higher levels of gender role conflict were more tolerant of harassment. The training intervention was partially effective, with a positive impact on the identification of harassment but no significant impact on harassment tolerance. Men scoring lower on the Success, Power, and Competition subscale of the Gender Role Conflict Scale (J. M. O'Neil, B. F. Helms, R. K. Gable, L. David, & L. S. Wrightsman, 1986) evidenced a greater reduction of harassment tolerance compared with those with higher scores on the scale.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-82
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology of Men and Masculinity
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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