Male fertility and the undescended testis in Down syndrome. How to counsel parents

I. M. Thompson, D. D. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evaluation of fertility in male patients with Down syndrome has generally revealed poor psychosexual adaptation and markedly abnormal semen quality, which have thus far been uniformly associated with sterility. Up to 50% of male patients with Down syndrome have undescended testes. Life-table analysis of survival among patients with Down syndrome, as well as the low incidence of testicular tumors, would suggest that orchidopexy may be unnecessary in some patients. In most patients, however, orchidopexy is appropriate to allow for subsequent testicular examination. Parents of children with Down syndrome must be appropriately counseled regarding the fertility of their children and the treatment options for cryptorchidism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-303
Number of pages5
JournalPostgraduate Medicine
Volume84
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1988

Fingerprint

Cryptorchidism
Down Syndrome
Fertility
Parents
Orchiopexy
Life Tables
Semen Analysis
Testicular Neoplasms
Infertility
Survival
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Male fertility and the undescended testis in Down syndrome. How to counsel parents. / Thompson, I. M.; Thompson, D. D.

In: Postgraduate Medicine, Vol. 84, No. 5, 1988, p. 299-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, I. M. ; Thompson, D. D. / Male fertility and the undescended testis in Down syndrome. How to counsel parents. In: Postgraduate Medicine. 1988 ; Vol. 84, No. 5. pp. 299-303.
@article{2ba8fd48c4ce467babb3270905be062f,
title = "Male fertility and the undescended testis in Down syndrome. How to counsel parents",
abstract = "Evaluation of fertility in male patients with Down syndrome has generally revealed poor psychosexual adaptation and markedly abnormal semen quality, which have thus far been uniformly associated with sterility. Up to 50{\%} of male patients with Down syndrome have undescended testes. Life-table analysis of survival among patients with Down syndrome, as well as the low incidence of testicular tumors, would suggest that orchidopexy may be unnecessary in some patients. In most patients, however, orchidopexy is appropriate to allow for subsequent testicular examination. Parents of children with Down syndrome must be appropriately counseled regarding the fertility of their children and the treatment options for cryptorchidism.",
author = "Thompson, {I. M.} and Thompson, {D. D.}",
year = "1988",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "299--303",
journal = "Postgraduate Medicine",
issn = "0032-5481",
publisher = "Medquest Communications LLC",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Male fertility and the undescended testis in Down syndrome. How to counsel parents

AU - Thompson, I. M.

AU - Thompson, D. D.

PY - 1988

Y1 - 1988

N2 - Evaluation of fertility in male patients with Down syndrome has generally revealed poor psychosexual adaptation and markedly abnormal semen quality, which have thus far been uniformly associated with sterility. Up to 50% of male patients with Down syndrome have undescended testes. Life-table analysis of survival among patients with Down syndrome, as well as the low incidence of testicular tumors, would suggest that orchidopexy may be unnecessary in some patients. In most patients, however, orchidopexy is appropriate to allow for subsequent testicular examination. Parents of children with Down syndrome must be appropriately counseled regarding the fertility of their children and the treatment options for cryptorchidism.

AB - Evaluation of fertility in male patients with Down syndrome has generally revealed poor psychosexual adaptation and markedly abnormal semen quality, which have thus far been uniformly associated with sterility. Up to 50% of male patients with Down syndrome have undescended testes. Life-table analysis of survival among patients with Down syndrome, as well as the low incidence of testicular tumors, would suggest that orchidopexy may be unnecessary in some patients. In most patients, however, orchidopexy is appropriate to allow for subsequent testicular examination. Parents of children with Down syndrome must be appropriately counseled regarding the fertility of their children and the treatment options for cryptorchidism.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023708113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023708113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 299

EP - 303

JO - Postgraduate Medicine

JF - Postgraduate Medicine

SN - 0032-5481

IS - 5

ER -