Making time for tobacco cessation counseling

Carlos R Jaen, Benjamin F. Crabtree, Stephen J. Zyzanski, Meredith A. Goodwin, Kurt C. Stange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The objective of this study was to examine the incidence, targeting, and time demands of tobacco cessation advice by community family physicians. Methods. Research nurses directly observed 2 days of outpatient visits to 138 family physicians in northeast Ohio. Smoking status was identified by patient questionnaire. Visit characteristics were determined from direct observation and billing data. Visits by smokers with and without smoking cessation advice were compared. Results. The incidence of tobacco cessation advice was highest during wellness visits (55% vs 22% for illness visits; P < .001). Smokers seen for a tobacco-related chronic illness were more likely to receive advice than those seen for a chronic problem not related to tobacco (32% vs 17%; P=.05). The average duration of advice was less than 1 1/4 minutes. There were no significant differences in the duration of advice across different types of visits. Conclusions. Physicians are providing brief, targeted interventions for smoking cessation in family practices. The findings support the feasibility of implementing a brief intervention with all smokers seen during office visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-428
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Family Practice
Volume46
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation
Family Physicians
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco
Counseling
Office Visits
Family Practice
Incidence
Chronic Disease
Outpatients
Smoking
Nurses
Observation
Physicians
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Physician's practice patterns
  • Physicians, family
  • Primary health care
  • Smoking cessation
  • Tobacco smoke pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Jaen, C. R., Crabtree, B. F., Zyzanski, S. J., Goodwin, M. A., & Stange, K. C. (1998). Making time for tobacco cessation counseling. Journal of Family Practice, 46(5), 425-428.

Making time for tobacco cessation counseling. / Jaen, Carlos R; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Goodwin, Meredith A.; Stange, Kurt C.

In: Journal of Family Practice, Vol. 46, No. 5, 05.1998, p. 425-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jaen, CR, Crabtree, BF, Zyzanski, SJ, Goodwin, MA & Stange, KC 1998, 'Making time for tobacco cessation counseling', Journal of Family Practice, vol. 46, no. 5, pp. 425-428.
Jaen CR, Crabtree BF, Zyzanski SJ, Goodwin MA, Stange KC. Making time for tobacco cessation counseling. Journal of Family Practice. 1998 May;46(5):425-428.
Jaen, Carlos R ; Crabtree, Benjamin F. ; Zyzanski, Stephen J. ; Goodwin, Meredith A. ; Stange, Kurt C. / Making time for tobacco cessation counseling. In: Journal of Family Practice. 1998 ; Vol. 46, No. 5. pp. 425-428.
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