Maintenance of renal autoregulation during infusion of aminophylline or adenosine.

A. J. Premen, J. E. Hall, H. L. Mizelle, J. E. Cornell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adenosine has been postulated to link control of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal blood flow (RBF) with changes in renal metabolism. In the present study, we examined the role of adenosine in renal autoregulation by comparing the responses of normal anesthetized dogs to step decreases in renal artery pressure (RAP) to the response obtained after receptor blockade of adenosine with aminophylline or by flooding the kidney with exogenous adenosine. In six dogs at normal RAP, intrarenal infusion of aminophylline (10 mumol/min) did not alter renal hemodynamics. GFR and RBF were well autoregulated (greater than 90% of control) at RAP values equal to or greater than 85 mmHg before and after aminophylline. At RAP equal to 75 mmHg, GFR and RBF decreased by 27 +/- 10 and 20 +/- 8%, respectively, before aminophylline and by 25 +/- 7 and 13 +/- 6% after aminophylline. In a different group of six dogs, intrarenal infusion of adenosine (6 mumol/min) significantly increased RBF (32 +/- 9%) and decreased GFR (38 +/- 10%) at normal RAP. However, GFR and RBF were both well autoregulated (greater than 90% of control) at RAP values equal to or greater than 85 mmHg before and after adenosine. At RAP equal to 75 mmHg, GFR and RBF decreased by 10 +/- 5 and 7 +/- 3%, respectively, before adenosine and by 12 +/- 6 and 17 +/- 5% after adenosine. Neither aminophylline nor adenosine attenuated the elevations in plasma renin activity associated with reductions in RAP. These data fail to provide evidence that adenosine is an important factor in autoregulation of GFR and RBF during acute reductions in RAP within the autoregulatory range.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American journal of physiology
Volume248
Issue number3 Pt 2
StatePublished - Mar 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Aminophylline
Renal Artery
Adenosine
Renal Circulation
Homeostasis
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Maintenance
Kidney
Pressure
Dogs
Purinergic P1 Receptors
Renin
Hemodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Premen, A. J., Hall, J. E., Mizelle, H. L., & Cornell, J. E. (1985). Maintenance of renal autoregulation during infusion of aminophylline or adenosine. The American journal of physiology, 248(3 Pt 2).

Maintenance of renal autoregulation during infusion of aminophylline or adenosine. / Premen, A. J.; Hall, J. E.; Mizelle, H. L.; Cornell, J. E.

In: The American journal of physiology, Vol. 248, No. 3 Pt 2, 03.1985.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Premen, AJ, Hall, JE, Mizelle, HL & Cornell, JE 1985, 'Maintenance of renal autoregulation during infusion of aminophylline or adenosine.', The American journal of physiology, vol. 248, no. 3 Pt 2.
Premen, A. J. ; Hall, J. E. ; Mizelle, H. L. ; Cornell, J. E. / Maintenance of renal autoregulation during infusion of aminophylline or adenosine. In: The American journal of physiology. 1985 ; Vol. 248, No. 3 Pt 2.
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