Magnetization transfer effects in MR-detected multiple sclerosis lesions: Comparison with gadolinium-enhanced spin-echo images and nonenhanced T1- weighted images

J. F. Hiehle, R. I. Grossman, K. N. Ramer, F. Gonzalez-Scarano, J. A. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

150 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: To define the relationship between magnetization transfer and blood-brain-barrier breakdown in multiple sclerosis lesions using gadolinium enhancement as an index of the latter. METHODS: Two hundred twenty lesions (high-signal abnormalities on T2-weighted images) in 35 multiple sclerosis patients were studied with gadolinium-enhanced spin-echo imaging and magnetization transfer. Lesions were divided into groups having nodular or uniform enhancement, ring enhancement, or no enhancement after gadolinium administration. For 133 lesions, T1-weighted images without contrast enhancement were also analyzed. These lesions were categorized as isointense or hypointense based on their appearance on the unenhanced T1-weighted images. RESULTS: There was no difference between the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of lesions as a function of enhancement. MTR of hypointense lesions on unenhanced T1-weighted images was, however, lower than the MTR of isointense lesions. CONCLUSION: We speculate that diminished MTR may reflect diminished myelin content and that hypointensity on T1-weighted images corresponds to demyelination. Central regions of ring-enhancing lesions had a lower MTR than the periphery, suggesting that demyelination in multiple sclerosis lesions occurs centrifugally. In addition, the short-repetition- time pulse sequence seems useful in the evaluation of myelin loss in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-77
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 25 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Magnetization transfer effects in MR-detected multiple sclerosis lesions: Comparison with gadolinium-enhanced spin-echo images and nonenhanced T1- weighted images'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this