Long-term treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has minor effect on clinical laboratory markers in middle-aged marmosets

Aubrey M. Sills, Joselyn M. Artavia, Brian D. DeRosa, Corinna N. Ross, Adam B. Salmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interventions to extend lifespan and improve health with increasing age would have significant impact on a growing aged population. There are now several pharmaceutical interventions that extend lifespan in laboratory rodent models with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) being the most well studied. In this study, we report on the hematological effects in a cohort of middle-aged common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) that were enrolled in a study to test the effects of daily rapamycin treatment on aging in this species. In addition, we assessed whether sex was a significant factor in either baseline assessment or as an interaction with rapamycin treatment. Among our cohort at baseline, we found few differences in either basic morphology or hematological markers of blood cell counts, metabolism or inflammation between male and female marmosets. After dosing with rapamycin, surprisingly we found trough blood concentrations of rapamycin were significantly lower in female compared to male marmosets. Despite this pharmacological difference, both sexes had only minor changes in cellular blood counts after 9 months of rapamycin. These data then suggest that the potential clinical hematological side effects of rapamycin are not likely outcomes of long-term rapamycin in relatively healthy, middle-aged marmosets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere22927
JournalAmerican Journal of Primatology
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • erythrocytes
  • healthy aging
  • leukocytes
  • longevity
  • mTOR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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